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The best places to live for families in Thailand


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If you are looking at relocating to Thailand, you can be rest assured that there are many places that are family-friendly in which to settle. From beautiul islands with plenty of beach activities, to mountainous regions with cooler weather, Thailand has it all. Here, we list the 5 best places to live for families. 5 Of Thailand’s Best Places To Live For Families 1. Hua Hin This gorgeous beach town is popular with families as it offers plenty of attractions and amenities for every age. Moreover, it is home to an amazing night market and a wide variety of restaurants. […]

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When they use terms such as relocate and settle, I assume they are referring to Thai families? If not then there is nowhere in Thailand which is easy and convenient to relocate and certainly not settle. The article suggests they mean foreigners. How can you settle when you are forever concerned about visas and work permits. What about becoming a Thai National for your children and the ability for them to work in the country when they leave school? You’d think they had the same immigration laws as the U.K. or Australia the way they talk - Utter nonsense. 

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38 minutes ago, Bob20 said:

What's with all these "best 8" "best 10" topics?

Looks like TAT has its people thinking up lists now instead of numbers 🤣

This is starting to feel like TVF already.

Nothing to do with TAT. Looks like you just made that up.

 

Ann Carter is an award-winning journalist from the United States with over 12 years experience in print and broadcast news. Her work has been featured in America, China and Thailand as she has worked internationally at major news stations as a writer and producer. Carter graduated from the Walter Williams Missouri School of Journalists

 

 

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Love the generous use of the word 'pristine' when describing various beaches. I just spent a month in Phuket, a week or so in Krabi, and another month now in Koh Samui. NONE of Thailands beaches are pristine. No matter where you go there is rubbish somewhere on the beach or nearby.

Nice try. 

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5 hours ago, Soidog said:

When they use terms such as

 

5 hours ago, Soidog said:

You’d think they had the same immigration laws as the U.K. or Australia the way they talk - Utter nonsense. 

It appears you believe that this was written by Thais. "they"

It wasn't. 

Just written by a professional farang journo who gets paid to "write" stuff.

I also think it is a lot easier for us to live here than for a Thai family to decide they want to live in Australia. I just showed up here 12 years ago and stayed.

We put Thais through a huge process just to go to Oz on a simple holiday.

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2 hours ago, DWiener said:

Love the generous use of the word 'pristine' when describing various beaches. I just spent a month in Phuket, a week or so in Krabi, and another month now in Koh Samui. NONE of Thailands beaches are pristine. No matter where you go there is rubbish somewhere on the beach or nearby.

Nice try. 

You won't find pristine there. But you will at ThongNai Pan Koh Phangan. 

No rubbish. 

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2 hours ago, RobMuir said:

It appears you believe that this was written by Thais. "they"

It wasn't. 

Just written by a professional farang journo who gets paid to "write" stuff.

I also think it is a lot easier for us to live here than for a Thai family to decide they want to live in Australia. I just showed up here 12 years ago and stayed.

We put Thais through a huge process just to go to Oz on a simple holiday.

Actually I didn’t assume it was written by a Thai. It was written by Ann Carter which isn’t a Thai name. The reference to “They” being the person or organisation writing it! 
 

I don’t think you can compare the complexity of “us” living here to a Thai moving and living to Australia. The amount of state safety nets and health care they would receive is far higher than we get living in Thailand. I hear this same argument in relation to the U.K.  I would also add that few foreigners come to Thailand and attempt to work in English Fish & Chip shops or Thai factories. Many Thais visit countries like the U.K., Australia, Japan and South Korea on tourist visas and disappear in to shops, factories, restaurants and massage parlours never to be seen again. That’s why those governments are more stringent for long term visitors. 

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6 hours ago, Soidog said:

few foreigners come to Thailand and attempt to work in English Fish & Chip shops or Thai factories

You are right about the fish and Chip shops but many foreigners work in the Industrial factory areas usually in specialist or management roles. The majority of the factories are owned by Japanese and USA/Europeans and they like to have their people on the ground.

Many foreigners come and open bars/brothels or are employed as pimps/bar managers etc.

Soi 6 Pattaya etc

Many are employed by the hospitality industry, real estate, etc

 Thousands of teachers.

It is quite easy for us to get a work permit, just fill out a few forms down the labour office and they give you one.

And of course about 3 million foreign workers fill factories, construction jobs etc.

 

6 hours ago, Soidog said:

don’t think you can compare the complexity of “us” living here to a Thai moving and living to Australia

Hardly complex. I showed up here 12 years ago on a tourist visa on arrival 30 dayer. Just show up to immigration every so often and fill out some simple forms, good to go. Too easy.

Impossible for a Thai to do that in Australia. 

I contemplated applying for Thai citizenship, but I didn't want to pay the tax. My choice.

And there is many ways to bend the rules. I previously paid IO a small monthly fee to turn a blind eye to some of the regulations which was easier for me at the time. 

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2 hours ago, RobMuir said:

You are right about the fish and Chip shops but many foreigners work in the Industrial factory areas usually in specialist or management roles. The majority of the factories are owned by Japanese and USA/Europeans and they like to have their people on the ground.

Many foreigners come and open bars/brothels or are employed as pimps/bar managers etc.

Soi 6 Pattaya etc

Many are employed by the hospitality industry, real estate, etc

 Thousands of teachers.

It is quite easy for us to get a work permit, just fill out a few forms down the labour office and they give you one.

And of course about 3 million foreign workers fill factories, construction jobs etc.

Hardly complex. I showed up here 12 years ago on a tourist visa on arrival 30 dayer. Just show up to immigration every so often and fill out some simple forms, good to go. Too easy.

Impossible for a Thai to do that in Australia. 

I contemplated applying for Thai citizenship, but I didn't want to pay the tax. My choice.

And there is many ways to bend the rules. I previously paid IO a small monthly fee to turn a blind eye to some of the regulations which was easier for me at the time. 

But what he is saying is it is 2 totally different Immigration systems and you can't compare the two.

You are happy with living as a tourist/visitor in Thailand but you have none of the benefits that Thais can obtain in western countries once they go through the Immigration process.

Hence why the process is much more arduous. Along with many foreigners abusing their visas, as someone mentioned prior.

On another note. I found if you have a good income/finances and your Thai partner/family has ties to Thailand, getting visas is not that hard.

And once your Thai partner has visas and a travel history, it's not that hard to obtain visas to travel 

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4 hours ago, Marc26 said:

But what he is saying is it is 2 totally different Immigration systems and you can't compare the two.

You are happy with living as a tourist/visitor in Thailand but you have none of the benefits that Thais can obtain in western countries once they go through the Immigration process.

Hence why the process is much more arduous. Along with many foreigners abusing their visas, as someone mentioned prior.

On another note. I found if you have a good income/finances and your Thai partner/family has ties to Thailand, getting visas is not that hard.

And once your Thai partner has visas and a travel history, it's not that hard to obtain visas to travel 

Couldn’t have put it better myself. Thanks for saving me the time to respond to @RobMuir   

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