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Thailand has been ranked as the second most dangerous country to drive in according to a driver’s educational platform. Only South Africa is deemed to be a more dangerous place to drive than the Kingdom of Thailand with the US coming in third place. The Transport Ministry reported that there were 32,190 road accidents in 2020 and 2021 and that most of the casualties involved pickup trucks. There were 21,052 accidents in 2020, and 11,138 accidents in 2021. The US-based Zutobi, a driver’s educational website that annually measures road accidents throughout the globe, revealed that Thailand scores badly in five […]

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The driver is the cause of 95% of the accidents. Vehicle failure accounts for the other 5%. If the driver was driving with due care and attention which also includes speed, then there would be a considerably fewer road issues. Excess speed with overloading followed by poorly maintained vehicles is seen everyday on every highway. The authorities only control some of the violations when they think about it. Driver education is what is required to bring the standard up to acceptable levels and that starts on day 1. I drove in South Africa, Western Cape and although poor driving was seen there but not on the scale on dsplay in Thailand. Just look on Tiktok which is littered every day with dozens of tragic stories, it is time to get a grip.

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Yea talking about the drivers education ,i remember once we were going from Bkk to Koh phangan with a minibus full packed 15 people and alot of cases and the heaven opened up and the raining came down like a flood and the driver sped up more and laughing  and i said to my friend we ain't driving on the road anymore now we are surfing on the road and it was very scary and after next restroom stop we took our bags and left the minibus,never again minibus i say .

We took a private car and he listened and drove carefully :)

 

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1 hour ago, Thaiger said:

Causes of accidents:

It all boils down to a lack of common sense.

 

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34 minutes ago, Khunwilko said:

More nonsense!

I assume the statistics presented are based on reported accidents and as such they are quite interesting. And they show that the most common reported accident is a pickup driver losing control of their vehicle at high speed on a straight road. It fits with my prejudices of pickup owners being selfish people (rear orifices but that term tends to be censored). Why else would they own such a car when they don't need one? And they never seem to have the money to replace those huge tires when they're reduced to racing slicks. 

But it seems obvious to me that most accidents never get reported. Such as the times I've been clipped by cars and motorbikes while out walking. Or the numerous small motorbike accidents that surely must happen everywhere all the time. 

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3 hours ago, Thaiger said:

The Ministry of Transport revealed motorbikes did not cause the most accidents

 

A statement like that baffles me (or rather the audacity of someone thinking they might get away with it). It's factually correct but the chosen wording makes it sound like a useful revelation when it's neither (useful nor revealing) and hardly has any bearing on the topic. I'm (almost) equally baffled by the abundance of irrelevant statistics that were thrown into the article (not the statistics themselves but the reasoning behind including them).

The topic is "road safety", not "road accidents"; if 100% of all road accidents would cause no more than a scratch, road safety would be near 100%. If 100% of all road accidents would cause deaths, road safety would be near 0%.

Wen it comes to accidents involving serious injuries, accidents involving motorbikes stand head and shoulders above the rest, and that matters a whole lot more than "accidents in general".

 

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3 hours ago, Sawarot said:

I assume the statistics presented are based on reported accidents and as such they are quite interesting. And they show that the most common reported accident is a pickup driver losing control of their vehicle at high speed on a straight road. It fits with my prejudices of pickup owners being selfish people (rear orifices but that term tends to be censored). Why else would they own such a car when they don't need one? And they never seem to have the money to replace those huge tires when they're reduced to racing slicks. 

But it seems obvious to me that most accidents never get reported. Such as the times I've been clipped by cars and motorbikes while out walking. Or the numerous small motorbike accidents that surely must happen everywhere all the time. 

What on earth do you mean "reported incidents"? Who do you think reports them and gathers them?

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3 hours ago, Sawarot said:

But it seems obvious to me that most accidents never get reported.

Yes they are - but they aren't analysed or collated properly. Where do you think statistics come from? not just police..... are you looking at deaths , serious injuries or minor injuries?

The truth is you are LESS likely to die in a 4-wheeled private vehicle in Thailand than the USA.....

If you try the blame game, you just don't understand road safety.

Edited by Khunwilko
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if you are poor, a vulnerable motorist e.g on 2 wheels, then Thailand is dangerous. But it boils down to who you are.

4 hours ago, Sawarot said:

It fits with my prejudices of pickup owners being selfish people (rear orifices but that term tends to be censored). Why else would they own such a car when they don't need one? And they never seem to have the money to replace those huge tires when they're reduced to racing slicks. 

More nonsense and self-admitted prejudice.

 

 

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It takes certain qualities to survive on the roads here. Patience, being very conscious of your surroundings, driving defensively, avoiding excessive speed, especially in town, following basic traffic rules and laws and avoiding being overly stupid, at all times. 

 

Those of us with driving skill, and a strong desire for not only survival, but the avoidance of terrible injury, are constantly scanning the road, in front of us, beside us, and behind us. There are an exceptionally high number of reckless fools on these roads, and it is the only way to preserve our lives, and those of our families, and friends, who may be driving with us, and depending on us. 

When I was growing up, we took drivers education courses. They showed us horrendous films, of semi trucks plowing into cars, and literally obliterating everything in their path. They also showed us graphic images of head on collisions. 120mph impacts. Even as a young kid, it made quite an impression. It was horrific, and it was hard to get those images out of your head afterwards. But, it left a lasting impression, and when I started driving, I understood it was serious business, and that it was a very dangerous thing to do. Also, I had the benefit of my lovely Mom, as my instructor. She spent countless hours in the car with me giving me tips, advice, and teaching me driving etiquette, courtesy and respect toward other drivers. That was priceless, and I doubt many Thai kids benefit from that kind of guidance. 

I see people driving here, with their families in the car, and doing things, and taking the kinds of risks no rational or sane person with common sense would do. What for? To gain one minute? Why take those risks? What is the logic? Often, when I am cruising along at 100kph, someone cuts right in front of me. Or someone comes out from the side road, right in front of me. I have to slam on my brakes, or change lanes to avoid him. I look in my rearview mirror, and there is nobody behind me. So, if he had waited two seconds, he would have had completely safe passage onto the highway. What gives? Where is the intelligence, caution, and prudence? Where is the common sense? What about just the survival instinct? 

 

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21 minutes ago, dmacarelli said:

It takes certain qualities to survive on the roads here. Patience, being very conscious of your surroundings, driving defensively, avoiding excessive speed, especially in town, following basic traffic rules and laws and avoiding being overly stupid, at all times. 

Those of us with driving skill, and a strong desire for not only survival, but the avoidance of terrible injury, are constantly scanning the road, in front of us, beside us, and behind us. There are an exceptionally high number of reckless fools on these roads, and it is the only way to preserve our lives, and those of our families, and friends, who may be driving with us, and depending on us. 

 

I have driven cars in a lot of different countries all over, Latin America, Caribbean, Asia

Rode MB's in Hanoi and Bangkok

 

If you go online, there are people warning not to drive in any of the countries I have driven in.

 

For me, I think you can drive anywhere, as long as you drive defensively and alert

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"The truth is you are LESS likely to die in a 4-wheeled private vehicle in Thailand than the USA....."

That's only because the North Americans don't have access to amulets to protect themselves while driving like morons.

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27 minutes ago, joseph said:

"The truth is you are LESS likely to die in a 4-wheeled private vehicle in Thailand than the USA....."

 

I'd imagine that's because there is 400mil cars in the US vs 10mil in Thailand............

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I have driven in South Africa and I believe it’s far more safe than Thailand, the worst place by far that I drove was India, no traffic sense or rules just do what you want and sound your horn over and over again. I do believe only from my own experience though that Thailand is probably the second worst place in the world at least from my own personal perspective. Every day I see a close call, but believe in Bangkok at least the motorcycle is to blame for the majority of traffic accidents they have no interest in safety for themselves just to get where they are going as fast as possible.

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12 hours ago, dmacarelli said:

It takes certain qualities to survive on the roads here. Patience, being very conscious of your surroundings, driving defensively, avoiding excessive speed, especially in town, following basic traffic rules and laws and avoiding being overly stupid, at all times. 

Those of us with driving skill, and a strong desire for not only survival, but the avoidance of terrible injury, are constantly scanning the road, in front of us, beside us, and behind us. There are an exceptionally high number of reckless fools on these roads, and it is the only way to preserve our lives, and those of our families, and friends, who may be driving with us, and depending on us. 

When I was growing up, we took drivers education courses. They showed us horrendous films, of semi trucks plowing into cars, and literally obliterating everything in their path. They also showed us graphic images of head on collisions. 120mph impacts. Even as a young kid, it made quite an impression. It was horrific, and it was hard to get those images out of your head afterwards. But, it left a lasting impression, and when I started driving, I understood it was serious business, and that it was a very dangerous thing to do. Also, I had the benefit of my lovely Mom, as my instructor. She spent countless hours in the car with me giving me tips, advice, and teaching me driving etiquette, courtesy and respect toward other drivers. That was priceless, and I doubt many Thai kids benefit from that kind of guidance. 

I see people driving here, with their families in the car, and doing things, and taking the kinds of risks no rational or sane person with common sense would do. What for? To gain one minute? Why take those risks? What is the logic? Often, when I am cruising along at 100kph, someone cuts right in front of me. Or someone comes out from the side road, right in front of me. I have to slam on my brakes, or change lanes to avoid him. I look in my rearview mirror, and there is nobody behind me. So, if he had waited two seconds, he would have had completely safe passage onto the highway. What gives? Where is the intelligence, caution, and prudence? Where is the common sense? What about just the survival instinct? 

Driving skills seem lacking in Thailand and my pet peeve is drivers licences or a lack of them. Thai drivers licences can be bought in many places and most people in my village don’t even have a motorcycle licence. The number of children (8 years up) that ride motorcycles without any qualified instruction amazes me and there’s frequent accidents involving them. Drivers have no idea how to drive in and out of the dual lane roundabouts with many failing to give away to the right and lane hopping without signals because they’re too lazy to turn the steering wheel to stay in the lane. I see a lack of basic road knowledge everywhere I drive. If all drivers were made to do defensive driving course with their licence application I'm sure it’d make a difference. I had a friend who hired a car in Phuket and the police were pulling over all tourist drivers and fining them if they didn’t have a Thai or international licence while flagging all Thais through unchecked. Therein lies part of the problem, lack of traffic enforcement. 

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13 hours ago, Marc26 said:

I have driven cars in a lot of different countries all over, Latin America, Caribbean, Asia

Rode MB's in Hanoi and Bangkok

If you go online, there are people warning not to drive in any of the countries I have driven in.

For me, I think you can drive anywhere, as long as you drive defensively and alert

Ho Chi Minh is one place I have no desire to ride or drive, crazy place.

I have ridden in Bangkok several times and from Pattaya to Chiang Mai and back but Ho Chi Minh during peak traffic times just looks too crazy for me.

Also there is a road from New Delhi to Rishikesh (not the main highway) which was probably the scariest road I have ever been on, we had a driver and he took it all in his stride but I was terrified. There were wrecks of carts, cars, motorbikes, tractors, buses and trucks, I saw this all in one day. I was told later that it was one of the most dangerous roads in India 😬😬😬

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Only 3% of the accidents are caused by drunk drivers. But even then the government should work to get it as close to 0% as possible.

 

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17 minutes ago, Mazz11 said:

Ho Chi Minh is one place I have no desire to ride or drive, crazy place.

I have ridden in Bangkok several times and from Pattaya to Chiang Mai and back but Ho Chi Minh during peak traffic times just looks too crazy for me.

Also there is a road from New Delhi to Rishikesh (not the main highway) which was probably the scariest road I have ever been on, we had a driver and he took it all in his stride but I was terrified. There were wrecks of carts, cars, motorbikes, tractors, buses and trucks, I saw this all in one day. I was told later that it was one of the most dangerous roads in India 😬😬😬

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18 minutes ago, Mazz11 said:

Ho Chi Minh is one place I have no desire to ride or drive, crazy place.

I have ridden in Bangkok several times and from Pattaya to Chiang Mai and back but Ho Chi Minh during peak traffic times just looks too crazy for me.

Also there is a road from New Delhi to Rishikesh (not the main highway) which was probably the scariest road I have ever been on, we had a driver and he took it all in his stride but I was terrified. There were wrecks of carts, cars, motorbikes, tractors, buses and trucks, I saw this all in one day. I was told later that it was one of the most dangerous roads in India 😬😬😬

To be honest, Hanoi was pretty easy

I found the other drivers were much more passive and didn't need to gain every last inch, they let traffic flow 

 

I loved having a MB in Bangkok this last time

 

I love exploring during the day but the heat and congestion wipes me out and I also feel a bit limited

 

With the MB I was hitting 2 different food places in different areas a day

 

Renting a Vespa in December for BKK

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21 hours ago, Thaiger said:

Thailand has been ranked as the second most dangerous country to drive in according to

TAT.

They say like their tourism figures Thailand will strive to take first place next year, and this years results were only a small hiccup. TAT will endeavour to ensure all figures provided are as accurate as all figures provided to tourism ministry.

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21 hours ago, Sawarot said:

It fits with my prejudices of pickup owners being selfish people (rear orifices but that term tends to be censored). Why else would they own such a car when they don't need one? And they never seem to have the money to replace those huge tires when they're reduced to racing slicks. 

I own a Toyota Pick-Up, 10 years old, never any problems, either with the vehicle or on the road. I need a Pick-Up to carry my work tools and to convey my GF and her family to the market twice a week.

AM I SELFISH?

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I am not sure how they ranked the USA third, if it is based on total accidents and not accidents per million population perhaps. 

I have driven in Spain, Portugal, Italy, Ireland, Canada, and 46 of the USA states including driving in the cities of Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, Dallas, and Houston.  

Unquestionably Thailand is the most dangerous.  The roads are narrow, often badly luminated and the motorcycles have no regard to any driving rules.  When you get to an intersection in Thailand it is a game of vehicle chicken to see who will block the other allowing you to proceed.  The motorcycles zip inbetween and in front of cars on both the left and right side.  The fact you have your turn signal on is of no consequence. 

I have lived in Thailand now for three years. Not once during that three year period have I ventured out without seeing motorcycles going the wrong way on a one way street.  At night it is typical to see multiple motorcycles some with side cars with no headlights or tail lights. 

To me, there is no comparison with driving in those other countries versus Thailand.  In Spain everyone drives as if they are Mario Andretti, Ireland dangerous because of the narrow roads, and New York, Dallas, Houston, and LA are harrowing because of the number of cars on the road.  However, all of them are far far far safer than a trip on the streets of Thailand. 

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