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News Forum - Chinese travellers forced to stay home as rest of Asia re-opens to tourism


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With Asian countries re-opening to foreign arrivals, there will be one significant tourism market missing for now – the Chinese. In China, according to a Reuters report, international air travel is currently at just 2% of pre-pandemic levels, as officials continue to pursue zero-Covid status. The absence of Chinese visitors will mean a US$255 billion annual spending hole in the global tourism market. According to the Reuters report, Chinese tourists accounted for 25% – 30% of business at Phuket’s Laguna resorts prior to the pandemic. Managing director Ravi Chandran says they’re now focusing their attention on the European, US, and […]

The story Chinese travellers forced to stay home as rest of Asia re-opens to tourism as seen on Thaiger News.

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"According to the Reuters report, Chinese tourists accounted for 25% – 30% of business at Phuket’s Laguna resorts prior to the pandemic. Managing director Ravi Chandran says they’re now focusing their attention on the European, US, and Middle Eastern markets."

I think it is a really good thing to re-build Thailand's tourist industry without the Chinese; it is a good long-term strategy to have a diverse customer base and thus not become reliant on any one country and/or group.

Yes, China is a large and lucrative market which should be pursued, but there is also an inherent danger in becoming reliant on it; ask the South Koreans from 2017 when they wanted to incorporate a THAAD system into their country's defenses. The short story is that China used their tourist numbers as a political weapon and I can't think of a reason to believe that they won't do it again against others. If Thailand becomes reliant on China tourist numbers, it is certain that it'll be used against the Kingdom if/when they next have a dispute.

Re-build the tourism industry, but keep China as a source of extra, bonus profit, not as the main customer.

 

Edited by Shade_Wilder
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1 minute ago, Shade_Wilder said:

I think it is a really good thing to re-build Thailand's tourist industry without the Chinese; it is a good long-term strategy to have a diverse customer base and thus not become reliant on any one country and/or group.

This is the best sensical post. I wish they would see it and take heed.

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I guess all the brand new houses around CM that are already long time un-occupied and overgrown might resemble Angkor wat ruins by the time their owners finally get back,

Watching a DW docco last night about housing/relocations in China I now better understand the desire to move OUT or have a bolt-hole in other countries.

 

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This story is no different from TAT expecting 10m visitors next month 🤭 or the government preferring richer tourists 💰.

Thailand will get the visitors that want to visit here, not the visitors that they prefer.

Unless the country creates a situation that will attract them.

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1 hour ago, Thaiger said:

With Asian countries re-opening to foreign arrivals, there will be one significant tourism market missing for now – the Chinese. In China, according to a Reuters report, international air travel is currently at just 2% of pre-pandemic levels, as officials continue to pursue zero-Covid status. The absence of Chinese visitors will mean a US$255 billion annual spending hole in the global tourism market. According to the Reuters report, Chinese tourists accounted for 25% – 30% of business at Phuket’s Laguna resorts prior to the pandemic. Managing director Ravi Chandran says they’re now focusing their attention on the European, US, and […]

The story Chinese travellers forced to stay home as rest of Asia re-opens to tourism as seen on Thaiger News.

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Maybe chinese know their virus best

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The title makes it look as if China bans people to get out, like North Korea. 

All they did is a 2 week quarantine when they come back from abroad. Ok, in that way they are sort of forced, but isn't there any other way to write it? 

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57 minutes ago, DiJoDavO said:

The title makes it look as if China bans people to get out, like North Korea. 

All they did is a 2 week quarantine when they come back from abroad. Ok, in that way they are sort of forced, but isn't there any other way to write it? 

I've been saying this for weeks but to no avail. Firstly, there's no flights, secondly those that do fly are eye-wateringly expensive and thirdly it's two weeks hotel quarantine plus a week self-isolation on return.

Instead we've had the ban on passports (rubbish) plus all manner of nonsense generated by western media and promulgated by those who think the Washington Post and the New York Times are the ultimate truthtellers.

By the way, China hasn't collapsed yet, neither has Evergrande.

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2 hours ago, DiJoDavO said:

The title makes it look as if China bans people to get out, like North Korea. 

All they did is a 2 week quarantine when they come back from abroad. Ok, in that way they are sort of forced, but isn't there any other way to write it? 

1 hour ago, Poolie said:

I've been saying this for weeks but to no avail. Firstly, there's no flights, secondly those that do fly are eye-wateringly expensive and thirdly it's two weeks hotel quarantine plus a week self-isolation on return.

Instead we've had the ban on passports (rubbish) plus all manner of nonsense generated by western media and promulgated by those who think the Washington Post and the New York Times are the ultimate truthtellers.

By the way, China hasn't collapsed yet, neither has Evergrande.

 

Respectfully, you guys seem to be trying to be offended by hinting that this story is somehow 'Anti-China'; I don't believe that it is. No one really believes that Chinese people will be out in numbers until late next year, and even you two aren't contradicting that idea. Further, many people believe that Chinese tourism is a mixed bag; that means both good and bad. Finally, sorry but China doesn't do itself many favors; if they want to have a better reputation in the world and in the world's press, they need to work on it.

I am actually a fan of China. I first visited in the late 80s and early 90s, have gone back several times since, and even lived there for a spell or two. I would like to see China as a member in good standing of the international community and I believe that it would be in China's interest as well.

In the late 90s/early 2000s (especially) there was an absolutely wonderful and breath-taking reduction of poverty in China. It came about for three basic reasons; the incredible hard work and drive of the Chinese people, the willingness of other countries (especially Western countries) to open their markets to China, and beginning to integrate China into the global system through membership in the WTO. 

Win, Win, Win.

The hope for this policy, and indeed how it started with the WTO, was to integrate China into an international system of rules-based relations whereby nations could get along for the benefit of all.  

I thought it was a good idea then, and I think it is a good idea now.

The problem now is China; they are not keeping their end of the bargain and States globally are starting to notice and sit up (proverbially). China maintains access to foreign markets and international organizations, but doesn't allow equal access to its own market and/or internal systems. Yes, I know history and why they might be... skittish, but this was the deal that they signed up to, this was the deal which has so benefitted them, and if they continue to break this deal, it'll be the thing that harms them and others.

The equation is simple; the West and others will receive China as an international member of the global rules-based system as long as China acts as a member of the international rules-based system. Many believe that China isn't holding up its end of the bargain, and that is why you see distrust and wariness; behind the scenes, many countries are wondering if China is to be trusted and as they are leaning against a positive response, they are wondering what to do about it.

The question for the future is simple; if China doesn't adopt and follow rules-based international norms as a responsible member of the international community, should it continue to be a member of that community?

The answer to that question and its implications are going to be a doozy.

 

 

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27 minutes ago, Shade_Wilder said:

The question for the future is simple; if China doesn't adopt and follow rules-based international norms as a responsible member of the international community, should it continue to be a member of that community?

Why the US rules, because that's what they are, and not International norms? China deals with a hundred countries and all are satisfied - except one. Guess who? (Forget Australia, they're a lapdog.)

PS. I dont perceive the article to be anti-Chinese, it's the refusal of anything harmless coming from China that's frustrating.

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15 hours ago, Poolie said:

Why the US rules, because that's what they are, and not International norms? China deals with a hundred countries and all are satisfied - except one. Guess who? (Forget Australia, they're a lapdog.)

PS. I dont perceive the article to be anti-Chinese, it's the refusal of anything harmless coming from China that's frustrating.

No, they are not US rules, they are international rules/norms/pacts created, evolved and expanded upon by a host of nations through labourious processes (many international agreements took literally years to formulate). Yup, the US was very influential in the process, but as it has been a Super-power for the last 70+ years, that is to be expected. Respectfully, just because the US was influential in the various processes, it doesn't mean that they are bad or wrong; may I suggest that you look at the policy and not the player?

Hmm... perhaps you should scan a few more newspapers from around the globe; there is a lot of discontent with China at the moment.

Sorry, I do not understand what point you are trying to make in your 'PS'. I see a statement of fact that Chinese won't be travelling much. What do you see?

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Chinese (well some at least) are allowed out to play in Thailand.

 

 

4,510 travellers arrived in 2 days of reopening, 6 with Covid-19 Wed Nov 3

 

The top countries arriving in the first two days of the reopening were led by Japan with 725 travellers landing in Bangkok, followed by Singapore with 387, Qatar with 365, and Germany with 283. Interestingly, despite strong lockdown restrictions, China was the fifth most popular country of origin arriving into Bangkok so far this month, with 273 passengers landing.

 

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16 hours ago, Poolie said:

Why the US rules, because that's what they are, and not International norms? China deals with a hundred countries and all are satisfied - except one. Guess who? (Forget Australia, they're a lapdog.)

This is just taking it too far @Poolie . Of course the US is a big influence in the world and it’s easy to see everyone as a puppet. The reality is we are talking about the major economies of the world supporting rules based international agreements. All of the EU. All of Scandinavia. All of North America.  Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea , much of the Middle East. These international norms are not just US.
 

It is not in the interests of anyone and in particular the Chinese people to have their country upsetting the major economies and military powers in the world. It’s common sense and hopefully the Chinese leaders will return to a better relationship once Xi has cemented his presidency for life.
 

At the end of the day, we are all humans trying to get along on this small planet. We simply don’t need the BS from China or the US or any other country. Why can’t we try to work things out and develop things peacefully for all? 

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22 minutes ago, Soidog said:

Why can’t we try to work things out and develop things peacefully for all?

The same as always since day one of our existence on this planet, human greed for something more than their neighbour.

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16 hours ago, Poolie said:

Why the US rules,

Who said they were US rules, oh that’s right you. The original post you quoted to start this tangent was talking about international rules. You know the same ones China is so quick to point out when it’s to their advantage. 

 The Chinese will show up when they are good and ready. Hope Thailand is ready by then too. Good luck to both. 

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32 minutes ago, Soidog said:

This is just taking it too far @Poolie . Of course the US is a big influence in the world and it’s easy to see everyone as a puppet. The reality is we are talking about the major economies of the world supporting rules based international agreements. All of the EU. All of Scandinavia. All of North America.  Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea , much of the Middle East. These international norms are not just US.
 

It is not in the interests of anyone and in particular the Chinese people to have their country upsetting the major economies and military powers in the world. It’s common sense and hopefully the Chinese leaders will return to a better relationship once Xi has cemented his presidency for life.
 

At the end of the day, we are all humans trying to get along on this small planet. We simply don’t need the BS from China or the US or any other country. Why can’t we try to work things out and develop things peacefully for all? 

Comone China made trouble with all countries around the world, they even wanna dictate european countries what they can say in their own countries or in universities but this made the people niw vdry angry in eurole and becoming anti ccp China and pro Taiwan. They created an opposite effect. Better not feed this China ccp troll Poolie he made on all forums his pro ccp propaganda and anti west. And China made trouble with almost all countries in Asia and stealing their resources and fish.

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8 minutes ago, EdwardV said:

Who said they were US rules, oh that’s right you. The original post you quoted to start this tangent was talking about international rules. You know the same ones China is so quick to point out when it’s to their advantage. 

 The Chinese will show up when they are good and ready. Hope Thailand is ready by then too. Good luck to both. 

And we could all see how they respect international rules in the south china sea. China never respected international rules they are a threat to the whole world and destroying and stealing the resources and the biggest polluter of the globe.

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54 minutes ago, gummy said:

The same as always since day one of our existence on this planet, human greed for something more than their neighbour.

Sad but true mate. Wishful thinking by me I realise that. What’s worse is that most normal people just want to live their life, raise their family and enjoy life. It’s the world leaders and the nut jobs that get attracted to world domination. 

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3 hours ago, Soidog said:

This is just taking it too far @Poolie . Of course the US is a big influence in the world and it’s easy to see everyone as a puppet. The reality is we are talking about the major economies of the world supporting rules based international agreements. All of the EU. All of Scandinavia. All of North America.  Australia, New Zealand, Japan, South Korea , much of the Middle East. These international norms are not just US.
 

It is not in the interests of anyone and in particular the Chinese people to have their country upsetting the major economies and military powers in the world. It’s common sense and hopefully the Chinese leaders will return to a better relationship once Xi has cemented his presidency for life.
 

At the end of the day, we are all humans trying to get along on this small planet. We simply don’t need the BS from China or the US or any other country. Why can’t we try to work things out and develop things peacefully for all? 

Also an interesting point is they will now go after the so called little pinks like poolie. They will crackdown on the chinese ccp infiltration in Taiwan and europe.

 

https://www.thaipbsworld.com/you-are-not-alone-eu-parliament-delegation-tells-taiwan-on-first-official-visit/

 

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4 hours ago, Shade_Wilder said:

Yup, the US was very influential in the process, but as it has been a Super-power for the last 70+ years, that is to be expected.

All I needed to know. I'm just curious to how it's changed now the US is in decline. Blinken doesn't appear to have received the memo.

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4 hours ago, palooka said:

Chinese (well some at least) are allowed out to play in Thailand.

4,510 travellers arrived in 2 days of reopening, 6 with Covid-19 Wed Nov 3

The top countries arriving in the first two days of the reopening were led by Japan with 725 travellers landing in Bangkok, followed by Singapore with 387, Qatar with 365, and Germany with 283. Interestingly, despite strong lockdown restrictions, China was the fifth most popular country of origin arriving into Bangkok so far this month, with 273 passengers landing.

I know for sure 2 of the Japanese were my wife's cousin and her Japanese husband. So are these numbers of actual tourists or people returning home?

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4 hours ago, Shade_Wilder said:

No, they are not US rules, they are international rules/norms/pacts created, evolved and expanded upon by a host of nations through labourious processes (many international agreements took literally years to formulate). Yup, the US was very influential in the process, but as it has been a Super-power for the last 70+ years, that is to be expected. Respectfully, just because the US was influential in the various processes, it doesn't mean that they are bad or wrong; may I suggest that you look at the policy and not the player?

Hmm... perhaps you should scan a few more newspapers from around the globe; there is a lot of discontent with China at the moment.

Sorry, I do not understand what point you are trying to make in your 'PS'. I see a statement of fact that Chinese won't be travelling much. What do you see?

Yes and now they troubled too much around the world and are now on the monitor of the Nato and Europe. The European Nato members are battle improoved , trained in any nuclear attack since 70 years and technically advanced because all the tech China has was transfered from Europe, Germany or the US. They even have no gps and the space navigation from China us over european companies. The countries listed as the highest developoed countries in the world where China is not listed and still listed as a development country and decades behind europe and scandinavian countries. They are that stupid to wake up the most battle prooved countries and tech advanced in the world.

https://www.thaipbsworld.com/you-are-not-alone-eu-parliament-delegation-tells-taiwan-on-first-official-visit/

 

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On 11/4/2021 at 9:21 AM, Thaiger said:

With Asian countries re-opening to foreign arrivals, there will be one significant tourism market missing for now – the Chinese. In China, according to a Reuters report, international air travel is currently at just 2% of pre-pandemic levels, as officials continue to pursue zero-Covid status. The absence of Chinese visitors will mean a US$255 billion annual spending hole in the global tourism market. According to the Reuters report, Chinese tourists accounted for 25% – 30% of business at Phuket’s Laguna resorts prior to the pandemic. Managing director Ravi Chandran says they’re now focusing their attention on the European, US, and […]

The story Chinese travellers forced to stay home as rest of Asia re-opens to tourism as seen on Thaiger News.

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hmmmm who open for tourists... its going more bad

https://e.vnexpress.net/news/news/86-percent-of-covid-patients-in-hcmc-hospitals-are-vaccinated-survey-4381526.html

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