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https://youtu.be/Am_5B4NE2O8 There are several reasons why Thailand is one of the most desirable locations for ex-pats. Here, you can get affordable access to modern conveniences and year-round sunny weather. With its laid-back way of life, delectable cuisine, and vibrant culture, it’s certainly a remarkable place to call home. Plus, being close to nature is easy here, with everything from beautiful waterfalls and mountainous forest getaways to soft-sand beaches and the pure blue sea. Moving to Thailand With everything it has to offer, moving to Thailand will be a colourful adventure. However, there are things you need to know for a […]

The story Moving to Thailand checklist – What you need to know before your move as seen on Thaiger News.

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A nice video, but not most of the things I would advise people to prepare for before moving to Thailand……. And while we are at it “year round sunny weather”? Year round? Sunny? 😂😂😂

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It is good to know the rosy side of relocating to Thailand. However anyone who is thinking of moving to Thailand have to do their homework by reading all the past 5 years critical news in the internet to understand the real scenario what is happening in Thailand. It is only then easy to decide if they can accommodate all those hidden and darker sides of Thailand which might be surprises for them if they never take into account 

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8 hours ago, Thaiger said:

https://youtu.be/Am_5B4NE2O8 There are several reasons why Thailand is one of the most desirable locations for ex-pats. Here, you can get affordable access to modern conveniences and year-round sunny weather. With its laid-back way of life, delectable cuisine, and vibrant culture, it’s certainly a remarkable place to call home. Plus, being close to nature is easy here, with everything from beautiful waterfalls and mountainous forest getaways to soft-sand beaches and the pure blue sea. Moving to Thailand With everything it has to offer, moving to Thailand will be a colourful adventure. However, there are things you need to know for a […]

The story Moving to Thailand checklist – What you need to know before your move as seen on Thaiger News.

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Nature is so close.....that you can wake up to a river in your living room and an elephant in your kitchen.

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7 hours ago, Soidog said:

A nice video, but not most of the things I would advise people to prepare for before moving to Thailand……. And while we are at it “year round sunny weather”? Year round? Sunny? 😂😂😂

For me weather in Thailand is a negative 

 

I don't like the constant heat and humidity 

 

I am working from Boston the last 2 weeks simply because I love the weather in October 

 

Today is 15 C and Sunny

 

Perfect fall weather, IMO

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1 hour ago, Marc26 said:

For me weather in Thailand is a negative 

I don't like the constant heat and humidity 

I am working from Boston the last 2 weeks simply because I love the weather in October 

Today is 15 C and Sunny

Perfect fall weather, IMO

Just another example of how the Thais don’t understand their market. ALL Falange want sun beds and Need the sun. They have decided this is what we like, never ask . They have decided foreigners don’t like spicy food. Nothing, and I means nothing will change it. Cast in stone.  Most bizarre and insular nation I’ve come across and I’ve ever come across over 30 countries. Nothing compares !!! 

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You would have to be out of your tiny mind to consider moving here.  As for the year round sunny weather, I detest it, that isn't ''weather'' it's more like a form of torture. Draws back curtains in the morning ''Oh look, it's sunny today'' lol.

Just back from Europe, the weather was stunning, crisp, sunny, fresh, made me feel alive. Enough of this ''great  weather'' nonsense.

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5 hours ago, Soidog said:

Just another example of how the Thais don’t understand their market. ALL Falange want sun beds and Need the sun. They have decided this is what we like, never ask . They have decided foreigners don’t like spicy food. Nothing, and I means nothing will change it. Cast in stone.  Most bizarre and insular nation I’ve come across and I’ve ever come across over 30 countries. Nothing compares !!! 

Yep. And don't get me started on the face masks.

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2 hours ago, Scarface said:

You would have to be out of your tiny mind to consider moving here.

This is a statement that 10 years ago I would have disagreed with and would struggle to understand. However as I grow that bit older and approach the age of retiring, I’ve decided Thailand isn’t the place to live full time. It’s great for a long break of maybe a couple of months. I personally don’t want to escape the Christmas and New Year period in Europe. I’ve spent Christmas in Thailand on three occasions and it’s wasted. I like the snow and wrapping up warm. Most of all, I like the order that exists in my own country and knowing I’m in control of things and have full legal status. I don’t like wondering what’s going to happen in any given situation and if it will follow basic logic. 
 

Thailand is a beautiful country. It’s a fantastic experience. If you make it home then I think you lose that experience. It’s rather like the saying that you should never meet your hero’s. Thailand I’m afraid is the same. The longer you spend here, the less appealing and beautiful it becomes. 

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Thailand is nice for a holiday but not a home.  I have been living in Thailand for almost a year mow, and o discover that Thailand is not exactly what i see on the surface when i was a tourist. Thailand is not getting better, it's getting worse now with so much drug addiction now that kratum and marijuana are legalised

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There is a standard pattern of adjustment for people who live in a foreign country(s) (15 for me, and I know other members are similar), although the timing of each element varies wildly and can occur over months and/or years.

Step one is when everything is new and wonderful, and so much better than one's home country. This is obviously nonsense, but that euphoric feeling can last for literally years; it depends on the individual. I have even come across a (very!!!) few who never get out of this stage, but...

Step two is the crash when everything seems awful, and there are few things worse than being around an individual going through this stage; it is endless whining and whingeing. 

Step three is acceptance; yup, the place has both good and bad things, just like everywhere else (including one's home country).

I would guess that many, but not all, members have hit stage three.

If you are going to settle here, you must go through all three stages before deciding that this is "Home" or not. 

This is what you need to know before moving to a new place, this is what you need to experience before you make any serious decision(s), and this is what you need to know if you expect to have a good life here.

I can't speak for anyone else, but this is 'Home', warts and all, for me.

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11 minutes ago, Shade_Wilder said:

There is a standard pattern of adjustment for people who live in a foreign country(s) (15 for me, and I know other members are similar), although the timing of each element varies wildly and can occur over months and/or years.

Step one is when everything is new and wonderful, and so much better than one's home country. This is obviously nonsense, but that euphoric feeling can last for literally years; it depends on the individual. I have even come across a (very!!!) few who never get out of this stage, but...

Step two is the crash when everything seems awful, and there are few things worse than being around an individual going through this stage; it is endless whining and whingeing. 

Step three is acceptance; yup, the place has both good and bad things, just like everywhere else (including one's home country).

I would guess that many, but not all, members have hit stage three.

If you are going to settle here, you must go through all three stages before deciding that this is "Home" or not. 

This is what you need to know before moving to a new place, this is what you need to experience before you make any serious decision(s), and this is what you need to know if you expect to have a good life here.

I can't speak for anyone else, but this is 'Home', warts and all, for me.

I was in Step 1 for almost 20 years, but now in Step 2. Looking forward to Step 3, just wondering when it will kick in.

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Certainly at stage 3 now.

After my divorce early this year, although I was a little unsettled, I didn't project this on to Thailand.

Called my sister in the UK & told her. She immediately said: "Are you coming home"

Without even a thought I replied, that this is my home.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Shade_Wilder said:

There is a standard pattern of adjustment for people who live in a foreign country(s) (15 for me, and I know other members are similar), although the timing of each element varies wildly and can occur over months and/or years.

Good post @Shade_Wilder and absolutely correct. I think it’s referred to as the culture shock curve. I’ve been coming to Thailand for well over 20 years and for the past 15 or more years this has been my “home” for between 6 and 9 months of each year. I recognise all three stages and I would say I’m well in to stage 3. The only thing I would say, is that having got to stage 3 and totally happy with the fact there are good/bad, wrong/right things happening in the U.K. and Thailand, the bad and wrong things in Thailand are significantly more worrying and annoying than those in the U.K.  Not being able to park my bike right outside the coffee shop is annoying in the U.K.  it’s nowhere near as annoying and worrying as the total nut job drivers in Thailand for example. As such, I will never regard Thailand as home. I will always retain a home in Europe and keep the majority of my finances in Europe. Thailand has been and always will be a long holiday destination. 

 

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51 minutes ago, BigHewer said:

I was in Step 1 for almost 20 years, but now in Step 2. Looking forward to Step 3, just wondering when it will kick in.

Hi BH

I have participated in and led workshops on this very topic, I have gone through it several times, and I have worked with people living internationally almost all my life. The sum total of my experience that I can tell you is... wait for it... no one knows how long it lasts.

There are two related things that have worked for me and others; exercise and laughter. 

When in stage two, I found and observed that there isn't much laughter and thus aren't many endorphins. Same idea regarding exercise; none of the 'Runner's High" that is needed.

So, can I suggest two things? If you have a bicycle, get on it. If you don't have a bike, rent/borrow/buy one and get on it. ASAP. Second, go do whatever makes you laugh. Twice I got through stage two in Indonesia simply by visiting an old Indonesian friend of mine who has the single most infectious laughter known to mankind. One visit, a few beers, loads of laughter and I could actually feel stage two beginning to drain out of my body as I walked out his front door.

So, get on yer bike and have a laugh.

Good luck.

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1 hour ago, Soidog said:

Good post @Shade_Wilder and absolutely correct. I think it’s referred to as the culture shock curve. I’ve been coming to Thailand for well over 20 years and for the past 15 or more years this has been my “home” for between 6 and 9 months of each year. I recognise all three stages and I would say I’m well in to stage 3. The only thing I would say, is that having got to stage 3 and totally happy with the fact there are good/bad, wrong/right things happening in the U.K. and Thailand, the bad and wrong things in Thailand are significantly more worrying and annoying than those in the U.K.  Not being able to park my bike right outside the coffee shop is annoying in the U.K.  it’s nowhere near as annoying and worrying as the total nut job drivers in Thailand for example. As such, I will never regard Thailand as home. I will always retain a home in Europe and keep the majority of my finances in Europe. Thailand has been and always will be a long holiday destination. 

 

Afternoon, Mr Dog

Yes, you clearly get it. However, my 'Spidey Sense' tells me that while you are a long ways away from stage two, reading between the lines tells me that you aren't quite fully in stage three yet. But, I could be wrong; it does happen. Er... all too frequently.

However, I take issue with the graph you provided; I think it waaaaaaaay over-simplifies things and the scale(s) used are nonsense.

I would put the 'honeymoon' period much higher and the 'Acceptance' point lower. My experience, both personal and with a professional eye, says that the 'Acceptance' never reaches/equates the initial, euphoric happiness of stage one, but rather is a deeper, more satisfying mode of comfort and pleasure.

Secondly, while I have both seen and experienced this process in a span of a few months, I have also seen it go on for literally years (see BH's post above) on several occasions. I'd hate to think Members might not realize that the process can be weeks, months, years and/or even decades.

That said, it is just a graph, I am too lazy to find another, better one, and we are 'shooting the shit' on a Forum on Sunday afternoon.

Hope that you are enjoying your weekend, and raise an extra glass for me.

Cheers

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39 minutes ago, Shade_Wilder said:

Afternoon, Mr Dog

Yes, you clearly get it. However, my 'Spidey Sense' tells me that while you are a long ways away from stage two, reading between the lines tells me that you aren't quite fully in stage three yet. But, I could be wrong; it does happen. Er... all too frequently.

However, I take issue with the graph you provided; I think it waaaaaaaay over-simplifies things and the scale(s) used are nonsense.

I would put the 'honeymoon' period much higher and the 'Acceptance' point lower. My experience, both personal and with a professional eye, says that the 'Acceptance' never reaches/equates the initial, euphoric happiness of stage one, but rather is a deeper, more satisfying mode of comfort and pleasure.

Secondly, while I have both seen and experienced this process in a span of a few months, I have also seen it go on for literally years (see BH's post above) on several occasions. I'd hate to think Members might not realize that the process can be weeks, months, years and/or even decades.

That said, it is just a graph, I am too lazy to find another, better one, and we are 'shooting the shit' on a Forum on Sunday afternoon.

Hope that you are enjoying your weekend, and raise an extra glass for me.

Cheers

Yes I agree the graph isn’t right in terms of shape and timescales. I guess I feel like I’ve moved to stage three a few years back, but it could be I’m still moving up the acceptance curve and not fully there yet. I guess my decision a few years ago never to make Thailand my permanent “home” was based on the happiness I felt having accepted things. Perhaps things will improve further in the coming years? 

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3 hours ago, Shade_Wilder said:

There is a standard pattern of adjustment for people who live in a foreign country(s) (15 for me, and I know other members are similar), although the timing of each element varies wildly and can occur over months and/or years.

Step one is when everything is new and wonderful, and so much better than one's home country. This is obviously nonsense, but that euphoric feeling can last for literally years; it depends on the individual. I have even come across a (very!!!) few who never get out of this stage, but...

Step two is the crash when everything seems awful, and there are few things worse than being around an individual going through this stage; it is endless whining and whingeing. 

Step three is acceptance; yup, the place has both good and bad things, just like everywhere else (including one's home country).

I would guess that many, but not all, members have hit stage three.

If you are going to settle here, you must go through all three stages before deciding that this is "Home" or not. 

This is what you need to know before moving to a new place, this is what you need to experience before you make any serious decision(s), and this is what you need to know if you expect to have a good life here.

I can't speak for anyone else, but this is 'Home', warts and all, for me.

Yep, good post. I'm also currently in step 2 hence the whingeing :-) Step 3 hopefully sooner rather than later.

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18 hours ago, Soidog said:

  Most bizarre and insular nation I’ve come across and I’ve ever come across over 30 countries. Nothing compares !!! 

You must have never been to the US then  5555

 

The amount of people who have no idea where Vancouver is, would shock you

 

And it borders the US!

 

 

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1 minute ago, Marc26 said:

You must have never been to the US then  5555

Well I didn’t want to upset my fellow American forum members. But yes 😂😂

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I suppose it all depends on your circumstances.

I stayed in Thailand for a year between 2018 and 2019, it was great.

I have stayed for period of between three months to nine months on many occasions over the last thirty five years.

I spent twenty five years living between the UK, Germany, Sweden, Denmark, Holland and the USA so I am used to hopping all over the place, but my base was still the UK, house etc.

I have just got my non Imm 0 visa valid for 90 days which I will convert or whatever you call it to a one year visa next month when I arrive.

I will stay for one year and then see how it is, but if your circumstances are you can easily hop over and live in another country if Thailand become stale then all should be OK.

I would hate to become one of the long term moaning 'expats' I have come across on many occasions, their situation is they are stuck in Thailand as they can only afford to live in such a cheap country, in some boring backwater village surrounded by dim local gossipers,  due to their low pension income and have priced themselves out of ever going back home.

In the video explaining the dangers and scams of Thailand, the bar girl scam was not mentioned, this will affect many more retirees than tourists, with the I love old men, I love you, my mum and dad are sick as is the buffalo so can you give me money scam, also buy me a house and car and I will take care for you forever, well in between the other boyfriend arriving that is.

I will not be falling for that one. 😀

 

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29 minutes ago, Marc26 said:

You must have never been to the US then  5555

The amount of people who have no idea where Vancouver is, would shock you

And it borders the US!

I was working in Arlington Texas in 1991 for four months, I was sent over from a company in Germany who I had a software contract with.

It was thanksgiving and so at the company canteen we were served with turkey and vegetables etc. 

The woman serving me asked, "Hey, y'all have Turkeys in Europe", I said no it is the first time I have ever seen one. 😀

Another person asked me if we have credit cards in the UK, I said no we only use cash, and I asked what is a credit card. 

To many people I met Europe was just one place, we were all the same and Europe did not consist of separate countries with their own individual cultures.

 

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1 hour ago, JamesR said:

I was working in Arlington Texas in 1991 for four months, I was sent over from a company in Germany who I had a software contract with.

It was thanksgiving and so at the company canteen we were served with turkey and vegetables etc. 

The woman serving me asked, "Hey, y'all have Turkeys in Europe", I said no it is the first time I have ever seen one. 😀

Another person asked me if we have credit cards in the UK, I said no we only use cash, and I asked what is a credit card. 

To many people I met Europe was just one place, we were all the same and Europe did not consist of separate countries with their own individual cultures.

I could list anecdotes for days because I am married to an Asian and live in Canada 

 

The amount of mind bogglingly ignorant questions and statements I hear about both is mind blowing 

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