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News Forum - Is the new Boeing 737 Max safe to fly? New Netflix documentary argues the case against Boeing


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A new Netflix documentary, directed by Rory Kennedy, is a withering and forensic critique of the Boeing company and their complicit cover up of problems with their new Boeing 737 Max aircraft. ‘Downfall: The Case Against Boeing’ lacks drama or re-enactments of screaming passengers, but it catalogues a two decade-long decent from a company paranoid about safety to a company paranoid about its stock price. That Boeing, a proud US aviation technology manufacturer   “The safety culture at Boeing fell apart. It was corrupted, from the top, down, from pressures from Wall Street, plain and simple.” CHAIR OF THE COMMITTEE […]

The story Is the new Boeing 737 Max safe to fly? New Netflix documentary argues the case against Boeing as seen on Thaiger News.

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Well they just agreed a deal to sell a bunch of them to Qatar.

But they only got that deal because Airbus dumped Qatar as they are the customer from hell. 

I have followed the 737 Max story reasonably closely and there is no way I am going to fly on one. 

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2 hours ago, LoongFred said:

Really netflicks is a movie distributor and not aircraft experts. I don't go to Ben and Jerry's for advice on a knee operation.

It's not just Netflix, aviation experts from all over the world are still saying that the Max 8, sorry Max, is an inherently unsafe design and not just because of the software issues and bad training that caused the crashes that led to them being grounded. The old CEO of Virgin in Australia has just announced that he has gotten backing from American investors to start an new airline in Australia called Bonza with a deal to fly a small fleet of 737 Max 8's that no doubt they got at a discount. I for one won't be flying with them ever. 

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That's a rational conclusion for every business when accountants take over! Boeing moved it's manufacturing for this model to a different state to employ casual / scab labor to cut costs! Whenever profit becomes more  important than everything else, quality goes down the toilet! Accountants are destroying everything in their path!

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just saw the documentary, yesterday, it was awesome and very scary, very well done by that WSJ investigator

to think I was in one of them for a few times when I was flying with Thai airways, very scary

Boeing lost their hedge after their merger and got greedy, with a cultural change focus on safety and engineering to cutting costs no matter what

also competition from Airbus put them under a lot of "wallstreet" pressure

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this is a must see documentary,

and don't fly with those planes, they tried to cover it up once, and they will do it again

the FAA was knee deep in it too,

thank God it was Trump that grounded the planes, not the coward FAA

Edited by butterfly
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9 hours ago, LoongFred said:

Really netflicks is a movie distributor and not aircraft experts. I don't go to Ben and Jerry's for advice on a knee operation.

The NTSB, BEA, AAIB aren't movie distributors and they amongst others were gob smacked after their investigations. The FAA tend to either rubber stamp some issues or leave them gathering dust in their pending tray. Am I likely to fly on one? Not a chance.

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11 hours ago, anarchofarmer said:

That's a rational conclusion for every business when accountants take over! Boeing moved it's manufacturing for this model to a different state to employ casual / scab labor to cut costs! Whenever profit becomes more  important than everything else, quality goes down the toilet! Accountants are destroying everything in their path!

Boeing certainly have had problems with production quality and they apply to other Boeing models too.  But the 737 Max is a fundamentally flawed design.  It cannot be truly fixed.  The only true fix would be to scrap the 737 Max and start with an entirely new design.  A design that prioritises engineering quality and safety above profit.

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11 hours ago, Changnam43 said:

Boeing certainly have had problems with production quality and they apply to other Boeing models too.  But the 737 Max is a fundamentally flawed design.  It cannot be truly fixed.  The only true fix would be to scrap the 737 Max and start with an entirely new design.  A design that prioritises engineering quality and safety above profit.

I agree, it should be scrapped - but no-one shall ever find an accountant who'll agree to scrapping anything when it has a negative impact on the balance sheet!!

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